• Wed
    Apr
    30
    2014
    7:00pm
    Will Obamacare Fail Fresno?

    In Fresno County, approximately 200,000 people did not have health insurance before Obamacare. But the county is struggling to enroll people in the new exchanges. Why has Fresno been so challenging for Obamacare, and what can communities and local governments do to make it easier for people to receive these new benefits? Will newly insured people who have never had health insurance be able to get the care they need? Fresno County department of social services deputy director Deborah Martinez, Centro La Familia executive director Margarita Rocha, and Clinica Sierra Vista deputy chief of programs Kevin Hamilton visit Zócalo to discuss whether Fresno will be able to complete this transition to Obamacare, or whether the region could be left behind by this historic change in healthcare.

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  • Wed
    May
    7
    2014
    7:30pm
    What Does Southern California Need From the 710 Freeway?

    The 710 is one of the most important freeways in Southern California. It’s also shorter than originally planned: For nearly 50 years, legal and environmental challenges have stalled the freeway in Alhambra, 4.5 miles short of its intended destination, Pasadena. Over the decades, discussions about extending the freeway have cast its future as a local issue. But the 710 causes traffic, produces pollution, and affects commerce across Los Angeles and even beyond. UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies director Brian Taylor, Clean Tech Advocates senior advisor and former California Environment Secretary Linda S. Adams, L.A. Chamber of Commerce president Gary Toebben, and Southern California Association of Governments executive director Hasan Ikhrata visit Zócalo to discuss what the 710 means for all of us.

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  • Thu
    May
    8
    2014
    7:00pm
    How Should We Teach Children With Autism?

    One in 50 school-aged American children has an autism spectrum disorder. But there’s still no strong consensus on the best way to teach autistic students–besides spending impossibly large amounts of time and money on one-on-one instruction. How can we better prepare educators to work effectively with autistic students? And can we do a better job of utilizing cutting-edge neuroscience and psychiatric research in the classroom? Arizona State University educational psychologist Erin Rotheram-Fuller, Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center president and CEO Daniel Openden, and Mesa Public Schools special education director Jan Cawthorne visit Zócalo to discuss how teachers, parents, and schools can work together to get the best education possible to children on the autism spectrum.

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  • Fri
    May
    9
    2014
    7:30pm
    Can the Internet Be Rewired to Build a Smaller, More Cooperative World?

    Once upon a time, the Internet was supposed to build a more interconnected world, one where a plumber in Burbank could find common cause—and maybe even friendship—with an ornithologist in Kuala Lumpur. But it hasn’t worked out that way. Is the Internet doomed to be little more than an echo chamber? Or, can we come together to rewire and change the way we use the Internet so that it brings us closer to living in the kind of world we once envisioned? Director of the MIT Center for Civic Media Ethan Zuckerman, winner of the fourth annual Zócalo Book Prize for Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection, visits Zócalo to call for an Internet that connects humans more broadly to one another and creates greater understanding across cultures.

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  • Thu
    May
    22
    2014
    7:30pm
    Why Can’t Americans Balance Work, Love, and Play?

    Nearly 40 percent of Americans feel overworked, yet six in 10 don’t take the vacation days they’ve earned. In survey after survey, people say they’re too busy to make friends outside the office, too busy to date, too busy to sleep, and too busy to have sex. How is the pressure and stress of our busy lives resculpting our brains, shaping our jobs, changing our families—and affecting the leisure time we do have? Washington Post staff writer Brigid Schulte, author of Overwhelmed, visits Zócalo to discuss why Americans haven’t figured out how to lead balanced lives, and what we can do as individuals and a nation to get some relief from the chaos of modern life.

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  • Tue
    Jun
    3
    2014
    7:30pm
    Where Do Food Fads Come From?

    A few years ago, it felt like you couldn’t walk into a bakery, celebrate a birthday, or even attend a wedding without coming across a cupcake. Just as suddenly, kale salads colonized restaurant menus, supermarkets started selling out of quinoa, and everyone had an opinion on the best brand of Greek yogurt. What determines which foods become trendy when? How do marketers, farmers, scientists, doctors, and even governments create food crazes? Journalist David Sax, author of The Tastemakers: Why We’re Crazy For Cupcakes But Fed Up With Fondue, visits Zócalo to explore why certain dishes take hold of our collective passion, and what impact trends like putting bacon on everything and the rise of the food truck have on our economy and our culture.

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  • Thu
    Jun
    5
    2014
    7:00pm
    Is Goldwater Libertarianism Dead?

    In the three decades Barry Goldwater represented Arizona in the U.S. Senate, he was a staunch economic conservative, champion of the Constitution, and proponent of states’ rights–as well as a defender of reproductive rights, gay rights, and the separation of church and state. Goldwater’s brand of libertarianism defined Arizona conservatism in the middle of the 20th century and is credited with sparking the resurgence of the American right in the 1960s. But what role does it play in the state and country today? Arizona Republic columnist Robert Robb, Arizona State University historian Donald Critchlow, and Slate political reporter Dave Weigel visit Zocalo to discuss the place of libertarianism in America’s political future.

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